Forensic Photography FAQs

Forensic Photography and Electronic Digital Imaging Subcommittee

  1. The mission of the Subcommittee is:

    1. To promote the education, research, communication, and standardization of activities and goals of the areas of crime scene investigations throughout the year and at each annual conference. This includes, but is not limited to, photography, scene documentation, evidence collection, evidence preservation, trace evidence collection, DNA recovery, footprint/tire track collection and preservation, and latent fingerprint detection and recovery.
    2. To provide speakers for the general session and trainers for workshops. The chairperson will coordinate with the education seminar planner coordinator to ensure that the areas under this subcommittee are represented in the program.
    3. The subcommittee will communicate with the membership through such media as the Journal of Forensic Identification (JFI) and the Identification News.
    4. To provide information and resources on the areas’ activities to the membership of IAI.
    5. To help develop responses to issues concerning Crime Scene Investigations for the IAI.

  2. How do I request to serve on this committee?

    Contact the chair of the committee or with the incoming IAI President.

  3. What are the terms for serving on the committee?

    No term limits. Each person on the committee is appointed by the incoming IAI president and can be removed by the incoming IAI president as well.

  4. What are the responsibilities of the Chairperson?

    Review IAI applications where the applicant lists their primary area of expertise as photography; coordinate and set an agenda for the annual IAI committee meetings; give an annual report to the IAIís 4th VP (Chairperson of the Science and Practice Committee) on the committees yearly activities; provide updates for the IAI training manual and related issues in the field; provide responses to relevant issues, resolutions, and SWGIT documents; and assist the Conference Planner with workshops and lectures within the field of forensic photography and electronic digital imaging.

  5. Who can I contact to obtain information regarding this committee?

    The IAI 4th VP (Science and Practices Committee) or the Chair of the Forensic Photography and Electronic Digital Imaging Committee.

  6. Are there any requirements for obtaining employment in Forensic Photography discipline?

    1. Academic? The academic requirements vary from agency to agency. It is highly suggested that the applicant possesses a degree in crime scene technology, forensic science, photography, or some other law enforcement related degree.
    2. Previous Experience? This depends on the individual agency and the needs of the agency. At times agencies will hire at entry level, at other times the demands within the agency require a more highly trained individual.
    3. Internship? Some agencies have an internship program that enables the intern to work in various parts of the agency. Some agencies accept volunteers within the Crime Scene and Photography Lab Units for the purpose of training and reviewing the individual’s talents.
    4. Position or Agency Specific? Some agencies require that the candidate possess a degree in either Crime Scene Investigations or a Bachelors or Masters in Forensic Science, Criminal Justice, or Photography. These requirements would be specific for employment as a Crime scene Investigator.

  7. What source(s) such as a website, standards, best practices, or guidance are utilized by practitioners working in this field?

    1. Journals
      • The Journal of Forensic Identification (IAI Journal)
      • State IAI journals
      • Journal of Forensic Sciences
      • Identification Canada
      • Fingerprint Whorld
    2. Newsletters
      • Identification News
    3. Books
      • Burnie, D. (2000). Light. New York: Dorling Kindersley Publishing, Inc.
      • Davis, P. (1995). Photography: Seventh edition. Boston: McGraw Hill.
      • Duncan, C.D. (2010). Advanced Crime Scene Photography. Florida: CRC Press.
      • Eastman Kodak Company. (1990). How to Take Good Pictures: A Photo Guide by Kodak. New York: Ballantine Books
      • Hyypia, J. (1981). The Complete Tiffen Filter Manual. New York: American Photographic Book Publishing.
      • Landt, A. (1993). The Kodak Workshop Series: Lenses for 35mm Photography. Rochester, New York: Silver Pixel Press.
      • McDarrah, F.W. & McDarrah, G.S. (1999). The Photography Encyclopedia. New York: Schirmer Books.
      • Miller, L.S. (1998). Police Photography. Cincinnati: Anderson Publishing Company.
      • Robinson, E. M. (2010). Crime Scene Photography. Burlington, MA: Elsevier Inc.
    4. Websites
  8. Can you provide recommendations on where to find information and resources to support research or a science project for:

    1. Elementary School
    2. High School
    3. College
      1. Journals
        • Journal of Forensic Identification
        • Journal of Forensic Sciences
        • Identification Canada
        • Fingerprint Whorld
      2. Newsletters
        • Identification News
      3. Books
        • Burnie, D. (2000). Light. New York: Dorling Kindersley Publishing, Inc.
        • Davis, P. (1995). Photography: Seventh edition. Boston: McGraw Hill.
        • Duncan, C.D. (2010). Advanced Crime Scene Photography. Florida: CRC Press.
        • Eastman Kodak Company. (1990). How to Take Good Pictures: A Photo Guide by Kodak. New York: Ballantine Books
        • Hyypia, J. (1981). The Complete Tiffen Filter Manual. New York: American Photographic Book Publishing.
        • Landt, A. (1993). The Kodak Workshop Series: Lenses for 35mm Photography. Rochester, New York: Silver Pixel Press.
        • McDarrah, F.W. & McDarrah, G.S. (1999). The Photography Encyclopedia. New York: Schirmer Books.
        • Miller, L.S. (1998). Police Photography. Cincinnati: Anderson Publishing Company.
        • Robinson, E. M. (2010). Crime Scene Photography. Burlington, MA: Elsevier Inc.
    4. Practitioners in the field
      1. Journals
        • Journal of Forensic Identification
        • Journal of Forensic Sciences
        • Identification Canada
        • Fingerprint Whorld
      2. Newsletters
        • Identification News
      3. Books
        • Burnie, D. (2000). Light. New York: Dorling Kindersley Publishing, Inc.
        • Davis, P. (1995). Photography: Seventh edition. Boston: McGraw Hill.
        • Duncan, C.D. (2010). Advanced Crime Scene Photography. Florida: CRC Press.
        • Eastman Kodak Company. (1990). How to Take Good Pictures: A Photo Guide by Kodak. New York: Ballantine Books
        • Hyypia, J. (1981). The Complete Tiffen Filter Manual. New York: American Photographic Book Publishing.
        • Landt, A. (1993). The Kodak Workshop Series: Lenses for 35mm Photography. Rochester, New York: Silver Pixel Press.
        • McDarrah, F.W. & McDarrah, G.S. (1999). The Photography Encyclopedia. New York: Schirmer Books.
        • Miller, L.S. (1998). Police Photography. Cincinnati: Anderson Publishing Company.
        • Robinson, E. M. (2010). Crime Scene Photography. Burlington, MA: Elsevier Inc.
      4. Websites